The New Jersey Geographic Birth Index and Delayed Birth Index, 1901-1929

Exciting news from Reclaim the Records for Giving Tuesday! The New Jersey Geographical Birth Index (1901-1929) and the New Jersey Delayed Birth Index (1901-1929) are both now online at the Internet Archive.

New Jersey Index of Births, 1915-19 — Middlesex County

Their announcement:

These records are currently only available in image format, as they were scanned from 94 reels of microfilm and have not yet had a text transcription project to turn their contents into a searchable database. However, the majority of both record sets were typed, and you should be able to use the Internet Archive’s built-in OCR capabilities to do a text-search of most of the images. Click the little magnifying glass on the far-left side of each item to do a “Search Inside.” … it’s a list of births that have been separated by county of birth, and sometimes by a major city within the county, and it’s not just a purely alphabetical list. Nice, right? (The “5” before the “Feb.” means 1925. A “6” means 1926, and so on.)
Luckily, New Jersey’s index is almost entirely typed! With a few extra names written in (neatly) here and there. Based on published New Jersey vital statistics, we think this collection covers 1,762,288 births in New Jersey (give or take a few) from 1901-1929, which were typed into books, which were then photographed onto 92 microfilm reels. Each of the reels has a few hundred images. It’s 493 GB in total.

The New Jersey Geographic Birth Index and Delayed Birth Index, 1901-1929
Homegrown in the Garden State

Excellent news for Giving Tuesday… if you are grateful for the New Jersey records Reclaim the Records has obtained and digitized, then please consider donating so more records can be made accessible.

Happy Searching!

A break? A hiatus? I’m back. #Genealogy

It’s been some time since my last post and I will say, I have missed sharing New Jersey genealogy news with you. While I have been busy with my career with Legacy Tree Genealogists, I still remain connected to my home state New Jersey! In September of 2020, I rejoined the Board of Trustees for the Genealogical Society of New Jersey and am working hard with other Trustees to bring the Society to wider audiences.

Some updates on the New Jersey State Archives include their holdings have recently received death certificates through 1961 (1962 should be available soon!) and the staff has created many new databases, including the Delayed Birth Certificate index (records mainly from the 1940s for births post-1900).

Another great announcement found recently comes from the Newark Public Library’s Newark Evening News Digitization Project. They have digitized the editions for 1883-1923 and have made them available online: https://www.digifind-it.com/newark/. If you have ancestry in Newark or Essex County, this resource is not to be missed.

Until next time! Happy Searching!!

New Jersey Vital Records: What? How? Where? in 2018

I’ve updated a 2015 (originally published in 2013) JRG post on accessing vital records in New Jersey:

Yes, unfortunately, obtaining vital records can be a challenge in New Jersey if you don’t know where to start your search. On March 3, 1848 New Jersey passed “An ACT relating to the registry and returns of births, marriages, and deaths, in the state of New Jersey” which required town clerks to annually submit a certified copy of births, marriages and deaths that occurred in their jurisdictions. This law created a wonderful set of records, we as genealogists, use to solidify our family branches, twigs and roots.

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Using the Indexes: New Jersey Births-Marriages-Deaths, 1901-03 and the Bride’s Index, 1901-14

Late in 2015, Reclaim the Records, a not-for-profit group of genealogists, historians, researchers, and open government advocates, worked with the New Jersey State Archives to acquire the microfilm to the birth, marriage and death annual indexes for 1901, 1902, and 1903.  While speaking with the Archives, she was also able to submit a request for the Bride’s Indexes for 1904-09 and 1910-14.  You can read more about the project’s Records Request #5: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, and Death Indices, 1901-1903 and 1901-1914 on their website.

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What? Wait! You’re Telling Me There Are No Indexes!?

A general sentiment that I read quite frequently on the messages boards is that doing research in New Jersey is so difficult.  Digging deeper, I find that the trouble is with the time period… the early 20th century.  The trouble isn’t with the records themselves; the trouble is the lack of indexes!

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New Jersey Vital Records: What? How? Where? in 2015

I’ve updated a 2013 JRG post on accessing vital records in New Jersey:

Yes, unfortunately, obtaining vital records can be a challenge in New Jersey if you don’t know where to start your search. On March 3, 1848 New Jersey passed “An ACT relating to the registry and returns of births, marriages, and deaths, in the state of New Jersey” which required town clerks to annually submit a certified copy of births, marriages and deaths that occurred in their jurisdictions. This law created a wonderful set of records, we as genealogists, use to solidify our family branches, twigs and roots.

Continue reading

New Jersey Vital Records: What? How? Where?

Yes, unfortunately, obtaining vital records can be a challenge in New Jersey if you don’t know where to start your search.  On March 3, 1848 New Jersey passed “An ACT relating to the registry and returns of births, marriages, and deaths, in the state of New Jersey” which required town clerks to annually submit a certified copy of births, marriages and deaths that occurred in their jurisdictions.  This law created a wonderful set of records, we as genealogists, use to solidify our family branches, twigs and roots.

Continue reading

New Jersey Bill Gives Adoptees Access to Their Medical History & Birth Records

NJ SENATE HEALTH COMMITTEE APPROVES BILL TO GIVE ADOPTEES ACCESS TO BIRTH INFORMATION

Here’s a recent Press Release from the office of Sen. Joseph Vitale, Chairman of the Senate Health, Human Services and Senior Citizens Committee:

TRENTON – A bill sponsored by Senate Health, Human Services and Senior Citizens Chairman Joseph F. Vitale which would give adoptees in New Jersey access to their medical history and birth records was approved June 13, 2013 by the Senate Health Committee.

“Every person deserves to know who they are and where they came from, but for many adoptees sealed records leave them in the dark on their family medical, cultural and social history, making it difficult to make decisions on their own personal well being,” said Senator Vitale, D-Middlesex. “This bill would give adopted people in New Jersey access to information that is vital to protect their health and establish a line of family history that would otherwise not exist.”

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