Update: NYC Vital Records Access – Act Today!

Time is running out… at 5pm on Monday April 23rd, the New York City Board of Health closes the comment period on the pending amendment to the NYC vital records access policy.

If you’re not aware, here’s some background from the New York Genealogical & Biographical Society:
Continue reading

Advertisements

New Jersey Vital Records: What? How? Where? in 2018

I’ve updated a 2015 (originally published in 2013) JRG post on accessing vital records in New Jersey:

Yes, unfortunately, obtaining vital records can be a challenge in New Jersey if you don’t know where to start your search. On March 3, 1848 New Jersey passed “An ACT relating to the registry and returns of births, marriages, and deaths, in the state of New Jersey” which required town clerks to annually submit a certified copy of births, marriages and deaths that occurred in their jurisdictions. This law created a wonderful set of records, we as genealogists, use to solidify our family branches, twigs and roots.

Continue reading

Using the Indexes: New Jersey Births-Marriages-Deaths, 1901-03 and the Bride’s Index, 1901-14

Late in 2015, Reclaim the Records, a not-for-profit group of genealogists, historians, researchers, and open government advocates, worked with the New Jersey State Archives to acquire the microfilm to the birth, marriage and death annual indexes for 1901, 1902, and 1903.  While speaking with the Archives, she was also able to submit a request for the Bride’s Indexes for 1904-09 and 1910-14.  You can read more about the project’s Records Request #5: New Jersey Birth, Marriage, and Death Indices, 1901-1903 and 1901-1914 on their website.

Continue reading

What? Wait! You’re Telling Me There Are No Indexes!?

A general sentiment that I read quite frequently on the messages boards is that doing research in New Jersey is so difficult.  Digging deeper, I find that the trouble is with the time period… the early 20th century.  The trouble isn’t with the records themselves; the trouble is the lack of indexes!

Continue reading

New Jersey Vital Records: What? How? Where? in 2015

I’ve updated a 2013 JRG post on accessing vital records in New Jersey:

Yes, unfortunately, obtaining vital records can be a challenge in New Jersey if you don’t know where to start your search. On March 3, 1848 New Jersey passed “An ACT relating to the registry and returns of births, marriages, and deaths, in the state of New Jersey” which required town clerks to annually submit a certified copy of births, marriages and deaths that occurred in their jurisdictions. This law created a wonderful set of records, we as genealogists, use to solidify our family branches, twigs and roots.

Continue reading

New Jersey Vital Records: What? How? Where?

Yes, unfortunately, obtaining vital records can be a challenge in New Jersey if you don’t know where to start your search.  On March 3, 1848 New Jersey passed “An ACT relating to the registry and returns of births, marriages, and deaths, in the state of New Jersey” which required town clerks to annually submit a certified copy of births, marriages and deaths that occurred in their jurisdictions.  This law created a wonderful set of records, we as genealogists, use to solidify our family branches, twigs and roots.

Continue reading

New Jersey Bill Gives Adoptees Access to Their Medical History & Birth Records

NJ SENATE HEALTH COMMITTEE APPROVES BILL TO GIVE ADOPTEES ACCESS TO BIRTH INFORMATION

Here’s a recent Press Release from the office of Sen. Joseph Vitale, Chairman of the Senate Health, Human Services and Senior Citizens Committee:

TRENTON – A bill sponsored by Senate Health, Human Services and Senior Citizens Chairman Joseph F. Vitale which would give adoptees in New Jersey access to their medical history and birth records was approved June 13, 2013 by the Senate Health Committee.

“Every person deserves to know who they are and where they came from, but for many adoptees sealed records leave them in the dark on their family medical, cultural and social history, making it difficult to make decisions on their own personal well being,” said Senator Vitale, D-Middlesex. “This bill would give adopted people in New Jersey access to information that is vital to protect their health and establish a line of family history that would otherwise not exist.”

Continue reading