Treasure Trove Thursday: US District Court – Newark, NJ [NARA RG21 M2123, 1914-1945]

A new Historical Records Collection at FamilySearch

An announcement in the June 26, 2016 edition of Nu? What’s New? The E-zine of Jewish Genealogy from Avotaynu (Volume 17, Number 25), alerted researchers that there were newly digitized naturalization records for U.S. District Courts in Newark and N.Y.C. Today, we’ll be looking at how to access these new online images.

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What? Wait! You’re Telling Me There Are No Indexes!?

A general sentiment that I read quite frequently on the messages boards is that doing research in New Jersey is so difficult.  Digging deeper, I find that the trouble is with the time period… the early 20th century.  The trouble isn’t with the records themselves; the trouble is the lack of indexes!

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Using the Online Collections – Ancestry vs. FamilySearch: Part B

FamilySearch has made great strides in providing digital records collections available freely for researchers and currently, there are eleven New Jersey Historical Records Collections. The focus of ‘Part B’ in the comparison of Ancestry vs FamilySearch is the collection – New Jersey Probate Records, 1678-1980. It has been online since June 2014. The collection is comprised of digitized images from the microfilming of the County Surrogates’ Courts in the early 1970s. The records available include a variety of components: wills, administrations, bond, receipts, indexes, adoptions and more.

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Crowdsourcing Opportunity: You Can Help!

Do you want to help get New Jersey resources online?  If so, here’s your opportunity to lend a hand in a crowd-sourcing project.   FamilySearch indexers and arbitrators make it possible for FamilySearch.org to publish an average of 1.3 million freely searchable records containing more than three million names each day.

Searchable historic records are made available on FamilySearch.org through the help of thousands of volunteers from around the world. These volunteers transcribe (index) information from digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. More volunteers are needed (particularly those who can read foreign languages) to keep pace with the large number of digital images being published online at FamilySearch.org.  In the FamilySearch indexing system, historical records are indexed by two different volunteers, then an experienced indexer known as an arbitrator reviews and corrects any discrepancies between the two indexers’ work. Only then can records be published for researchers on FamilySearch.org.  Continue reading

FamilySearch Reaches Amazing Milestone

An exciting announcement from FamilySearch: 

22 April 2013


Thanks A Billion
Thank you for contributing to the billion! We did it! We reached a major milestone of one billion records indexed and arbitrated since the launch of FamilySearch indexing in September of 2006. We are grateful for the many volunteers who dedicate their time and efforts to make these records freely available for online research.

Thanks a Billion
Kenneth B. (California, United States), Brittney S. (Idaho, United States), and April R. (Alberta, Canada) were the lucky ones to index and arbitrate the billionth record! They will receive a FamilySearch backpack stuffed with FamilySearch goodies. We also want to thank all the volunteers who have contributed to the billion records with a FamilySearch indexing badge. You can also download a free badge.

It took us seven years to reach the first billion. How long do you think it will take us to reach the next billion? The advances of technology and the dedication of our volunteers have increased the speed in which we can process and deliver records for publication. Join the global effort to make the next billion records available for family history research. Start indexing now!

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